Y Magazine

Jabal Akhdar

Shaquel al Balushi hits the road with friends for a camping trip and gets to a perfect spot to pitch tent, light a fire and chat with the stars

We are truly blessed when it comes to outdoor destinations near the place where we stay, be it Qurum or Seeb, load our vehicles with stuff needed for overnight camping and head to the site in the company of a few others who share the same vibes.

The idea of pitching tent, lighting a campfire and cooking your favourite food being curiously watched by twinkling stars and then lying on your back and trying to chat with the shiny things up in the sky who play a game of hide and seek β€” visible now and gone then as the clouds drift β€” is incredibly tempting.

It’s a splendid way to get to know nature better, but commitments often stop us from enjoying many of the real pleasures of life as we pursue priorities of a different kind.

Like many others, it has been a while since I went on a group camping trip, so I was happy to grab an opportunity to do that last week.

I left home in the afternoon with a bunch of friends looking for a new camping site in Jabal Akdhar.

Since we were fasting, we decided to stop by a hypermarket to buy Mandi, a traditional Yemeni dish made of rice and meat. This was our dinner.

On our way, thanks to the heat, we did not pay attention to the speed limit β€” and were promptly stopped by a Royal Oman Police patrol.

Two out of our three cars were slapped with a fine. That did not drain our spirits though: we kept driving, of course slowly, to reach the destination which was two-hours from my home in Al Seeb.

We arrived before sunset and started clicking images of the surroundings. The place was gorgeous, and it was hard not to take a good photo in that location.

We set our camp near Sayq, a village that nestles between Al Dakhiliyah and South Al Batinah Governorates.

Upon hearing the Isha Azan (prayer call) we had a light iftar. During that time we met a group of people who asked if we can give them some sugar to make tea.

This reminded of my old days in Al Amerat when neighbours were knocking on the doors to ask people if they needed any commodities for iftar.

We fell in love with the place and the generous people living around the campsite. They never hesitated to offer us food and drinks throughout the night.