Y Magazine

Hey Jude movie review: Nivin Pauly and Trisha are as poetic as a Beatles song

Hey Jude makes a sensitive and poignant portrayal of the normal lives of “abnormal” people.



The much touted ‘Hey Jude’ was one of the most anticipated releases of this year for more than one reason. Directed by ace film-maker Shyamprasad ‘Hey Jude’, brings in Trisha Krishna, the sweetheart of Tamil film industry, paired with Nivin Pauly, Malayalam’s favorite romantic hero. The title ‘Hey Jude’ is inspired from the namesake song by Beatles, is as poetic and musical as is the song. And why not! Shyamaprasad is known to adapt, absorb and recreate his craft inspired from other pieces of art. And, ‘Hey Jude’ is no different.

The film has Nivin Pauly, Trisha Krishna, Siddique, Neena Kurup and Vijay Menon in the lead along with guest/friendly appearances by Aju Varghese, Ousepachan and the director himself. ‘Hey Jude’ is easily a milestone for Nivin Pauly. In spite a good deal of memorable and loved roles in his kitty 28-year old Jude with his “abnormal abilities and needs” is a character that allows Nivin to prove his mettle as an actor. He portrays the unsocial, introvert Jude with a mature subtlety that deserves applause. The effort he put in to portray Jude isn’t limited to the few kilos he put on. It extends to the bolstering himself into a character far from likeable or adorable, like the characters he has famously played with ease.

Out of comfort zone
‘Hey Jude’ has Nivin step out of his comfort zone and ace it. Trisha Krishna is quite comfortable in her skin as the independent, yet volatile Crystal. Her performance has a strong backing of sound by Sayonara Philip who dubbed her voice for Trisha. Siddique plays Dominique, Jude’s hardworking, yet money hungry father. Apart from providing sound situational comedy Siddique soaks in his character with a maturity we take for granted from him. Neena Kurup is endearing as Jude’s mother Mary. And, welcome back, Vijay Menon! He plays, not a drug addict, but a sweetheart psychologist.

Nivin and Trisha seem comfortable, both in their own characters and with each other. Though they seem like two people who could never be friends, their chemistry is almost instant and beautiful, but unromantic. Jude and Crystal share a camaraderie of knowing the struggle that ensues fitting into a “normal” world with their “abnormalities.” ‘Hey Jude’ is about that struggle; it is about acceptance, love and self-discovery.

28-year old Jude is a man being treated as a boy because of what his father perceives is his lackadaisical attitude. His mother is more protective of him and his sister Andrea (Apoorva Bose) doesn’t know what to do of his whims. ‘Hey Jude’ is about Jude finding his way around his life when he is taken to Goa with his family in order to pay their last respects to his great-grand Aunt.

For a story principally based in Goa and Mattanchery, in Kochi, Girish Gangadharan wields his camera more to navigate the story than explore the beauty of the landscape. Never have I come across a film taking place in Goa underplaying the picturesque locales of Goa or Goan culture to this extent. Incidentally all the characters in the film, in and outside  Goa, happen to be Malayalis who speak impeccable Malayalam in the native accent!

In ‘Hey Jude’ a host of music directors, Ousepachan, Gopi Sundar, Rahul Raj and M Jayachandran, all of whom have worked with Shyamaprasad in his earlier films, make songs, though none remarkable, it beautifully blends into the narrative. The score by Ouseppachan, however, turned out to lack character.

Like an opera, the story takes its own sweet time to unravel and arrive at the crux of the matter. But it does not fare well to shun the narrative for the lag it takes because among other things ‘Hey Jude’ makes for a sensitive and poignant portrayal of the normal lives of “abnormal” people. This is the kind of movies in which “endings make way for new beginnings.”

Review by: Filmization Media