Y Magazine

Oman Travel: Quoeil Beach

Winter has arrived, folks. And that only means one thing: it’s time to hit the beach. Yes, I understand that “normal” people usually head to the waters for a dip during the summer months. But here in Oman, we do things a bit differently.



Anyone who has been living in the Sultanate for long will tell you how scorching the sands can get during the midsummer months. To be completely honest, you could even risk losing skin if you walk barefoot on the sands.

So, when I got the opportunity to hit the beach last week with my friend Imran, I didn’t dither. I quickly grabbed my beach gear and headed straight out.

As always, we started before the crack of dawn. But Imran quickly suggested that we visit someplace that we hadn’t visited before – and it seemed like a brilliant idea.

We started mining through Google Maps for a location to hit upon, and ‘Quoeil’ seemed like the spot. It’s a strange name for a beach but we knew that it was the place to go to.

From the satellite view of the locale, we came to know that we would be off-roading for a bit, so we prepared ourselves, and my Jeep, for the journey that lay ahead.

Quoeil is situated past Quriyat and en route to the beautiful beach in Qalhat, which I featured in the Y Magazine a few weeks back.

The drive is fairly straightforward and without any hitches. But you will have to keep your smartphone with you at all times, as you will have to take a turn-off towards Quoeil after Fins Beach and Tiwi. But, to be a bit more specific, you will have to travel 11km on Route 17 before you head off the road. From then on, you will be driving on pebbles and rocks, so it’s best you bring your A-game.

The pebbles make it hard for the SUV to travel on, and you may have to resort to letting air out of the tyres. Still, choosing the right path is the key to your safety. Remember: when in doubt, always bail out.

Nevertheless, in another 45 minutes – and about 850m of off-road driving – we reached the beach.

And boy, it was definitely worth all our efforts. The beach was deserted, making it the ideal place for photography. However, I did notice that the beach was home to fishing boats. There were no fishermen on the scene, though, as it was a Thursday (an off-day for fishermen).

I proceeded to click a few photos of the worn-out boats and the beach.

As you could see from the photos, the beach was striking. There’s also no litter on the sands, which added to the overall appeal of the location. That’s why the pebbles stood out in all my photographs.

There’s not much else to see at Quoeil, but I feel that it’s one of those locations that you must visit – overnight – with your friends to completely experience. Else, you’ll find yourself lonesome and abandoned – like Robinson Crusoe.

In some ways, that’s what Imran and I felt like, too. The beach was completely secluded from civilisation and there’s no one or anything to disturb the aura – not even a cellphone tower to provide you with connection to worldliness.

This is a place you could visit to get away from the eyes of the public. I’m darn sure that you’d have to light a fire or send some signals to the sea (if there are no fishermen on the shore) to actually be rescued if you find yourself in a tough situation.

That said, Imran and I quickly went for a dip in the waters before we headed back. This was when I realised that the beach was a naturally-existing bay. This was probably why there were boats docked on the shores.

We didn’t spend more time there, lest we find ourselves struggling to find the road in the dark. So, by 3pm, we retreated to our SUV and found our way back to civilisation – where wild things happen.