Y Magazine

Movies: Y’s Weekly Guide to What’s On

Deadpool

Pack away your preconceptions of superhero movies, because Deadpool flips the script entirely on its head.



Explaining the origin of Marvel’s most outrageous and rowdy anti-hero, Deadpool starts with a high-octane, high body count action sequence before flashing back to show how Wade Wilson (Ryan Reynolds), a former special forces operative turned mercenary, became the eponymous red spandex-wearing character, affectionately known as the Merc with a Mouth.

Obnoxious, crude and violent, Deadpool is a man intent on vengeance as he tracks down the rogue scientist (Ed Skrein) who nearly ruined his life, curing his terminal cancer and giving him accelerated healing powers, but completely disfiguring him in the process.

Just like the comic series on which it is based, Deadpool is self aware and Reynolds frequently breaks the fourth wall to trash just about everything, form superhero clichés to himself.

Full of uproarious humour, Deadpool adopts machine-gun tactics when it comes to jokes, but the blanket approach means that plenty hit the mark. Like its lead character, Deadpool has a twisted sense of humour, so if you’re easily offended, you should probably think twice about going. Not one for youngsters, but adults will have a field day with Marvel’s biggest breath of fresh air since Guardians of the Galaxy.

Verdict: 4/5

 

Criminal Activities

After a stock market investment goes south, four buddies are hauled in to see Eddie (John Tavolta), the mobster who part-financed their scheme. Eddie offers to wipe their life-threatening debt if they are able to kidnap a member of a rival crime syndicate and hold him for 24 hours. The only problem is they’re not criminals and the group soon realise they’re in way over their heads. Mixing crime with comedy was a formula for success in previous Travolta-starring hits like Pulp Fiction and Get Shorty, but a lack of build up and a lazy script makes Criminal Activities a poor imitation.

Verdict: 2/5

 

El Americano: The Movie

When the future of his father’s family circus is jeopardised by a rival group of bullying birds, the young parrot Cuco (voiced by Rico Rodriguez) takes it upon himself to venture to Hollywood and seek out his TV superhero idol, El Americano, for help. Embarking on a quest with his loyal band of friends, Cuco goes on to discover the hero inside himself. The film is the result of the first animated co-production between studios in Mexico and the US, but while the film’s heart and message are in the right place, the humour is bland, the music dated and the script cheesy.

Verdict: 1/5

 

Preview: The Faith of Anna Waters

Jamie (Elizabeth Rice) is a young crime reporter who travels to Singapore to investigate her sister’s death, which has been officially classed as suicide. Finding that the circumstances were mysterious, she delves deeper into the case with the help of her sister’s husband and uncovers a string of related suicides that point to the return of an ancient demonic entity.

Bollywatch: Tere Bin Laden: Dead or Alive


From initial impressions, the sequel to 2010’s Tere Bin Laden looks to be every bit as hilarious as its predecessor. In order to silence claims that the death of Bin Laden was a hoax, US Government agents track down a doppelgänger and convince a budding Bollywood director (Manish Paul) to shoot the footage that will “prove” the terrorist is dead.