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Movies: Y’s Weekly Guide to What’s On

Heading to watch some movies? Make sure you check out Y’s weekly guide to what’s on
Crimson Peak

As the 20th century beckons, relatively recently orphaned daughter of an American industrial millionaire, Edith (Mia Wasikowska), marries a British aristocrat (Tom Hiddleston) who brings her home to England against the wishes of his matriarchal sister (Jessica Chastain).



It soon becomes clear – to both Edith and the viewers – that something is not quite right about this brother and sister duo and that the family estate, Crimson Peak (so named for the colour of the clay on which it was built) has a haunted history that threatens to ensnare her.

Wasikowska shines as the porcelain-faced Edith and contrasts with the real star of the show – the titular Gothic mansion – perfectly, her innocence and naivety standing out strongly against the dark past of her new home.

It’s not that often that you see a big budget mainstream horror film with top-class production values, but then it’s not every day that the renowned master of visuals, Guillermo del Toro, gets his hands on a film and is given free rein to bring his twisted creation to life. Crimson Peak acts as a remedy to the cheap B-movie horrors that too frequently pollute cinema screens. Who cares if the suspense and chills peak a little too early? The fact is, this richly atmospheric Gothic romance horror is still an enjoyable spectacle.

Verdict: 3/5

Momentum

When a heist goes wrong, Alex (Olga Kurylenko) is left with more than the diamonds she bargained for, finding herself in possession of a USB drive and the target of a manhunt led by the mysterious and deadly “Mr Washington” (James Purefoy). The film stars Morgan Freeman as the corrupt senator that hired Alex and her thieving cohorts, but don’t let that draw you in, the veteran actor only appears fleetingly; the rest of the time the film is too busy moving rapidly from one senseless set piece to another.

Verdict: 2/5

Breaking Through

Casey Wright (Sophia Aguiar) and her LA dance crew are struggling for recognition after putting their hearts and souls into videos that barely reach triple figure views on YouTube. Enter Quinn (Jay Ellis), the talent manager who is conveniently looking for “the next big internet dance sensation” and sets about grooming them for the big time. The clichés are multiple, with everything from characters to choreography having been seen before in films like the Step Up series, and nothing about Breaking Through is good enough to linger long in the memory.  

Verdict: 2/5

Preview: Burnt

Revealing the passion and fire that comes with working on the top kitchens of the world, Burnt sees Bradley Cooper take on the role of Adam Jones, an all-star chef who had it all and then lost it through erratic behaviour and substance abuse. With a dream of winning back his reputation and claiming an elusive third Michelin star, he heads to London before returning to the home of haute cuisine, Paris.

Bollywatch: Prem Ratan Dhan Payo

Sooraj Barjatya is back in the director’s chair after a nine-year absence and the result is Prem Ratan Dhan Payo, a fantasy drama film about a king (Salman Khan) that longs to escape his duties, despite the loyal devotion of his subjects. He is given the opportunity to do so when he finds a common man who looks exactly like him (also played by Khan) and the two switch roles and responsibilities.