Y Magazine

Movies: Y’s Weekly Guide to What’s On

Mr Holmes

In 1947, Sherlock Holmes (Ian McKellen) is no longer the prominent detective but rather a semi-reclusive beekeeper enjoying a quiet retirement on the southern English coast.



As he ponders his life, we are thrown back into the past to the case that was to prove his undoing, and a more recent trip to Japan as the former super sleuth slowly learns a lesson in humility.

McKellen brings impressive gravitas to the role. His take on  Holmes as a remorseful, melancholy 93-year-old contrasts well with the intense focus of Benedict Cumberbatch’s portrayal in the UK television series Sherlock and the energetic flamboyance Robert Downey Jr brought to the character in the 2009 and 2011 films.

Finding a fresh twist on a well-renowned literary figure is no small feat but director Bill Condon has risen to the task.

This film flits between heart-warming and gripping as effortlessly as its lead moves from between being a reclusive beekeeper to a detective, once again, at the height of his powers.

Verdict: 4/5

 

Fantastic Four

After cracking inter-universe travel, Reed Richards (Miles Teller), Susan Storm (Kate Mara), Johnny Storm (Michael B Jordan) and Ben Grimm (Jamie Bell) return with strange powers that they must master to counter the threat from a former friend with dangerous powers of his own. With Fantastic Four films released in 2005 and 2007, there are questions as to whether this reboot was even needed. As a result, this effort lacks action and is unnecessarily dark. Let’s face it, when even the director (Josh Trank) disowns the film on Twitter, you know it’s probably one to avoid.

Verdict: 1/5

 

Vacation

In an attempt to recapture the nostalgia of a childhood trip, Rusty Griswold (Ed Helms) decides to drag his family 4,000 miles across America to a fictional theme park called Walley World. What follows is a series of mildly amusing events, each more implausible than the last; from accidental animal slaughter to a death-defying rafting trip. Filled with lavatorial humour and borderline racism at times, Vacation, which is a continuation of the National Lampoon’s Vacation series, has a few jokes hitting the mark but sadly, more of them miss it – by a long way.

Verdict: 2/5

 

Preview: Infinitely Polar Bear

Despite suffering from bipolar disorder, Cameron Stuart (Mark Ruffalo) makes the decision to move out of his halfway house and back in with his wife and two free-spirited daughters as he attempts to take responsibility as a father. The resulting film is quirky, funny and touching, all rolled into one.

Bollywatch: All is Well

Umesh Shukla’s family road trip movie promises lashings of humour as it deals with serious social issues, with plenty of twists and turns along the way. Abhishek Bachchan, Rishi Kapoor, Supriya Pathak and Asin, who will be hoping for a comeback after a notable absence, all join to star in the film due for release later this month.