Y Magazine

Movies: Y’s Weekly Guide to What’s On

Terminator Genysis

Time travel films will melt your mind. It’s like the law. The latest addition to the Terminator franchise doesn’t disappoint, opening in 2029, with Judgment Day having happened and all but a handful of human survivors wiped out in a nuclear annihilation.



The leader of the remaining revolutionary humans, John Connor (Jason Clarke), sends his best man, Kyle Reese (Jai Courtney), back in time to protect his mother, Sarah Connor (Emilia Clarke) from an attempt on her life at the hands of the machines.

Sounding familiar? Well, due to a glitch in the process, everything is flipped on its head and this is where the time-bending madness begins.

Sarah knows who Kyle is and Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Terminator has become like a father figure to her, training her for this day. The trio must then learn to trust each other and work together to avert the oncoming apocalypse.

Certain scenes from the first film are faithfully recreated, leading to a younger Schwarzenegger fighting his older self, which will have series fanboys buzzing with excitement, while providing the rest of us with a good old dose of 1980s nostalgia.

After the lukewarm response the third and fourth films received, director Alan Taylor had his work cut out, but seems to have succeeded where previous attempts failed, gaining the approval of series creator James Cameron. However, with key plot points revealed in the trailers, a lot of the suspense has sadly been sucked from this reboot.

Verdict: 3/5

 

Pressure

Repairing a broken oil pipeline 400 metres below sea level is routine work for the film’s four-man deep-sea dive crew, but when they become separated from their ship in a heavy storm, panic and paranoia start to set in as the air starts to thin. The film’s cramped setting is it’s biggest strength, creating a palpable feeling of claustrophobia, but it’s also its biggest weakness, with the film in need of strongly written characters once the initial thrill dies down. Sadly, this is where Pressure falls short, despite passionate performances from all involved.

Verdict: 2/5

 

The Pact 2

It’s June Abbot’s (Camilla Luddington) job to clean up grisly crime scenes. But when she starts to become plagued by vivid visions of a gruesome killer who appears to be mimicking the murders of the “Judas Killer” from The Pact, she must enlist the help of Annie (Caity Lotz) and Stevie (Haley Hudson), survivors from the first film, to put a stop to the hauntings. The original film was a sleeping creeper hit, although the sequel merely recycles old ideas, with little elaboration on what would appear to be key points in the plot.

Verdict: 2/5

 

Preview: Rosewood Lane

When radio talk show psychiatrist Sonny Blake (Rose McGowan) moves back to her hometown, following a family tragedy, she can’t help but notice the bizarre behaviour of the local paperboy. Fellow residents are terrified of the cunning sociopath and with good reason, as it turns out he may have a connection with several local murders.

 

Bollywatch: Bahubali

This period action drama is marking itself out as a much-watch, being filmed in two parts, released in multiple languages and becoming the most expensive film in Indian cinema history in the process. It tells the tale of two warring brothers who are battling for control of an ancient kingdom and has been likened to an Indian version of Troy, 300, or Hercules.