Y Magazine

Movies: Y’s Weekly Guide to What’s On

Sword of Vengeance

Set in 11th century England, shortly after the Battle of Hastings and the genocide enacted by William the Conqueror, Sword of Vengeance focuses on a lone Norman warrior (Stanley Weber) who falls in with rebels in the north and sets about righting an ancient wrong by ousting his tyrannical uncle, all the while attempting to repel oncoming invaders.



With the Game of Thrones TV series reigniting people’s passion for sword and sorcery epics, Sword of Vengeance looks to cash in on the renewed interest and will no doubt appeal to those who like their heroes and villains clad in mail and armour and love nothing more than hearing the clang of steel on steel.

Dialogue is sparse and the film is all the better for it, as director Jim Weedon is at his most poetic when choreographing and shooting intricate action sequences.

The film’s colour palate is an unimaginative one, made up of grey, grey and more grey, spattered with frequent spots of dark red blood and while Game of Thrones it certainly isn’t – both in terms of budget and quality – Sword of Vengeance is a strangely watchable film nonetheless.

Verdict: 3/5

 

Guardian 

Following the murder of her husband, who was an undercover police officer, Sarah (Dominique Diyose) finds both herself and her daughter the target of corrupt police officers and hired assassins who will stop at nothing in their quest to hide the truth and silence the pair for good. Luckily, Sarah is a trained martial artist able to pass on her vast knowledge to her daughter. While Guardian lacks the finesse of fellow Indonesian action flicks such as The Raid, it may just be a guilty pleasure for fans of the genre.

Verdict: 2/5

 

Afterparty 

The day after a wild party that gives 2012’s Project X a run for its money, Carlos (Luis Fernández), the ageing star of a horror-themed soap opera finds himself sealed in an unfamiliar house on a remote estate, along with three women from the night before. As the foursome attempt to find their way out they are forced to deal with a hooded killer stalking the building, intent on picking them off one by one. Unfortunately, the self-absorbed TV star lead is risible, making it very hard to care when things start going south.

Verdict: 1/5

 

Preview: Cold in July 

This crime drama set in 1980s Texas follows Richard Dane’s (Michael C Hall) life as it unravels after he killed an intruder in his home. Despite being hailed as a hometown hero, Michael soon fears for his life and those of his nearest and dearest as the burglar’s ex-convict father comes to town, bent on revenge.

Bollywatch: Guddu Rangeela

The title characters in this film are two cousins played by Amit Sadh and Arshad Warsi, who are trying to make a living in their crime-infested north Indian hometown. Singers with an orchestra by day, the duo become informants for local gangs at night in the hope of making a quick buck. Despite having a serious side to the plot, with Rangeela fighting a decade-old court battle to get justice for his murdered wife, Guddu Rangeela is, at its core, a good old comedy.